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20121101
20121130
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KQED (PBS) 43
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English 43
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
and then when it takes the place with the new leader of hamas who has to impose the cease-fire on all the other groups in gaza who are aiming at launching rockets or firing into israeli territory. but at the same time, clearly israel will have to let go some of its black cade of gaza. >> rose: also, david ignatius of the "washington post" from washington. >> on the larger question here of whether the obama administration before the election had an interest in minimizing the public's understanding that al qaeda still posed a threat, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on the broad theme, did they want the public to feel al qaeda was down for the count? yes, i think they did. >> rose: we conclude with julian sands, a british actor, talking about harold pinter, the english playwright and nobel laureate. >> in comparison with
hamas, organically linked to it but it is here trying to broker an end to the cease-fire, it is not doing what many want it to do which is break with israel, instead what it is trying to do is broker a cease-fire in which it brings this conflict, this conflict to an end, and which it preserves the peace treaty with israel because there is a profound need on the part of the egyptian government to deal with their monumental economic problems. >> rose: and then we turn to a new documentary filmed cause the central park 5, made by ken burns, his daughter sarah burns, and also joined by raymond santana. >> police department and the prosecutors made huge glaring errors, not entertaining alternate narratives, making huge mistakes in procedures. >> little kids should not be under that kind of interrogation, that is outrageous, that they missed the actual rapist several times and couldn't get him and i think people have made reputations prosecutors is made reputations on this and they can't abide by the notion that they could say, you know, i am sorry, put a period at the end
come here to try to broker a cease- fire but also expressing his full support for hamas. >> israel's operation in gaza was a disaster. this is aggression and we as egyptians will not remain silent. >> in the past 24 hours, israel has launched more than 300 air strikes, some in residential areas. by bombing this building in the heart of gaza city, israel says it is attacking what it calls hamas' terrorist infrastructure. but look how close this building is to schools and homes. the potential for civilian casualties is very high. if israel totally undermines hamas'authority in gaza, what will come in its place? tonight, israel continues to pound gaza and the militants fire out. today, the hopes of a cease-fire ends with fears of all-out war. >>> for more on the violence at a regional implications, i spoke a short time ago to erect, a fellow at the washington institut for near east policy. how much difference does egypt's new government make to that crucial relationship with israel? >> i think the fact you have the muslim brotherhood in power in egypt really made israel hesitant to ev
and hamas was finally announced in cairo today. but further negotiations on key longer-term sticking points between the two sides were put off for now. egypt's foreign minister, mohammed kamel amr, announced the breakthrough with secretary of state hillary clinton at his side. >> egypt has exerted efforts and conducted intensive discussions since the renewed outbreak of hostilities in the gaza strip with all parties: the palestinian leadership, the these efforts and communications managed to reach an agreement to a ceasefire and the return of calm and halt of the violence and the bloodshed that was witnessed recently. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today for a ceasefire in gaza. for it to hold, the rocket attacks must end, a broader calm returned. in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across region to consolidate this progess, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> woodruff: a short time later this afternoon, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu told reporters he leaves open the possibility of a groun
? >> now bbc world news america. israel kills the leader of hamas in the of the, causing an escalation of violence. governments should stop cutting benefits and start creating jobs. welcome to manhattan, kansas. >> may know more about technology than a tomcat's knows about baking gingerbread. >> welcome to our viewers. israel killed the military commander of hamas and launched a series of attacks. hamas vowed in this would open the gates to hell. military action will continue. >> for the people of gaza, it looked like a war, and as in most wars, civilians are caught up in the violence. the first target today was the biggest hamas's most senior military leader was typify and -- hit by a military strike. he died instantly. hamas says this is a major provocation. good >> they will pay a price for this, because he was one of our most exceptional leaders. >> she sat at the top of the military wing. tonight israel published these images. the army released video footage of him being tracked and the moment when his car was hit. israel said the strike followed a wave of rocket att
the 1950's. hamas released videos of rocket launches. the events of the last few weeks have silenced those who said they had forgotten how to fight israel. he said a land invasion be a political disaster for israel's prime minister. >> if they want a truce, we have demands and conditions. >> the border towns were quieter than gaza but still an ordeal. israel says it wants an end to rocket fire through cease-fire or military action. >> the endgame is clear. we want a situation where the civilian population of israel knows that no longer has to live in fear of incoming rocket fire from gaza. that can happen one way or another, but that is the goal we seek to defend our people. >> in gaza, israel attacked the building used by journalists. the raid killed a senior miti official in the -- a senior media official in the islamic group. another strike came in down the road. civilians on both sides need a ceasefire. political leaders in gaza and israel want to show that this was worth it. bbc news, gaza. >> there are diplomatic efforts to break a cease-fire. most of the attention is focused on cair
-fire between israel and hamas, bringing an end to eight days of fighting. the will it last? >> the people of this region deserve to live fear -- fogh -- to live free from fear and violence. this is a step in the right direction. >> and his sound has made him a superstar in italy. now this musician is out to make his mark. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. just a few hours ago, a cease- fire to end the fighting between israeli military forces and hamas militants. it came after hours of diplomacy involving the u.n. secretary general and the secretary general -- and the u.s. secretary of state. from gaza, jeremy bowen reports. a warning, you might find some of these images distressing. >> because i came back to life after the cease-fire began. -- gaza came back to life after the cease-fire began. coming to another israeli bombing campaign felt like another victory. this was the hamas interior ministry. governing with or without a cease-fire will be harder with the main administrative center ron. in jerusalem tonight, is real hint that more military
the ve between hamas and israel. the egyptian president is vzleading thek&a=ñduií6whÑc.é (. he hopes there will be results. hillary clinton in jerusalem. attacks have2g0y1e continued ao cease-fire has been announced. >> in/+úw5!h&ajm) gaza, israel'y dipbrqì(lc@&c+ talked. hamas was-óz:."!qmhh8 ing, t zero.all civilians were r cover. gaza after another israeli strike. while thisçkk÷ibñ was going ons and israel claimed to be ready for a truce as long it was kind that could both present as a victory. "tw1÷in the alertsoundedojpjd,b, they s 15 seconds to+>tbl-t,wr"uxjet te shelters before an impact. the residents are skeptical about cease-fires because they have seen so many that have not worked. not far away from of the ground forces were shelling gaza. the operation has been supported by its allies so farq"o00 but ty want a cease-:vmfw bloodshed of another invasion. jerusalem forg:>rgmfvñ÷iváazlor cease-fireal [he told the prime minister[wt strongly cautioned aa ground operation/et?zrl which wd only result in further casualties. >> there has been plenty already. two bro
faction only rules now in part of the west bank. its islamist rival hamas, which advocates violent resistance to israel, controls gaza. after long opposing abbas's u.n. efforts, the militant hamas recently endorsed the move. >> ( translated ): the hamas movement is with all the diplomacy acts that adds to the palestinian victories. we welcome the step for statehood at the united nations but we want it to be through a national program based on the resistance and keeps the palestinian rights. >> warner: general assembly recognition would put palestine on a par with the vatican at the u.n., but would not grant full representation. last year, abbas failed to win full u.n. membership for a state of palestine. the u.s. is opposed to even limited recognition, saying it will endanger prospects for a negotiated settlement with israel. state department spokeswoman victoria nuland issued that warning again today. >> we are concerned that this vote is going to make the work of getting... the work of getting the parties back to the table more difficult. >> warner: but the palestinians' u.n. rep
, the people celebrating survival. hamas feels bolstered more strongly than ever. it meant the balance of power was changing in favor of the palestinians. but thank god for the cease- fire, he said. and all the palestinians dealt with as the war agreed with me. -- that wtinessed the war agree with me. they already look like potential flashpoints. the men were moving around again, but resistance is where hamas draws strength. with smuggling tunnels and egypt reopening, the are close to the blockade, hard to a imagine them doing much for what they call a vital security measure. they have a breathing space, turning it to something better than that. the sad fact is that the conditions have turned attention to violence and are still there. they had a peaceful day at last, a chance to relax. but it won't stay like that until they can settle a century of conflict. >> in the other news, the former french president has been questioned for 12 hours about allegations that he received illegal donations at the 2007 presidential campaign. sarkozy is a material witness, meaning he is a suspect but not formall
eight days of punishing israeli air strikes and hamas rocket fire. each side claimed the ceasefire was a victory, but neither was certain the truce would last. we begin with a report from alex thomson of "independent television news" in gaza. >> reporter: party on, a show of joy, relief and unity. the flags of hamas, islamci jihad and fatah. all factions are friends today, at least in public the kalashnikovs are celebratory for now but hamas was pledging to break the ceaseifre even on day one if the blockade of gaza isn't lifted. >> if the palestinian will stay and the occupation in the west bank and here under israeli, gaza under siege, i don't think there is going to be a long ceasefire. one day or in a few days, a few weeks, a few months, they're gonna break this ceasefire. by occupation he means this, areas, just one militarized crossing from gaza to israel. and israel decides what crosses- - goods, people. it is a complete commercial strangehold on a place desperate to be a country. policemen able to show themselves on the streets without being targets for the first time in n
above the cease-fire between hamas and israel, which gained international plaudits? >> they are two events that in a way bracket the decision. one is a four $0.8 million deal with the international monetary fund. in a way, we have to concede that he is borrowing a page from the book of hosni mubarak. you make yourself helpful on the international stage. you brokered deals between israel and hamas and the palestinians. and then you do what you want at home. there was a test for him abroad. he now faces a democratic test. is he a genuine democrat, does he believe in one vote, one time? >> what should the u.s. reaction be? >> i think we should make it clear that even though we are grateful for what he did in gaza, we hold him to a high democratic standard within egypt itself. >> thank you very much indeed for joining us. no deal, that was the headline from the summit on the european union's long-term budget, which today ended in failure. while some heralded the discussion as constructive, the prime minister of britain accused brussels of living in a parallel universe. gavin hewitt is a
of the west bank. hamas will be in control of gaza. and jerusalem is in israel's hands. >> but does it mean that they can join u.n. bodies, for example, the u.n. -- international criminal court. and many worry that they could go after is real progress this is what caused israel the most concern, that the palestinians can challenge them in the international fora, most notably the international criminal court. there is concern that soldiers all over the world will be subject to icc challenges. they see it as a not a step toward peace, but one of confrontation. >> france voted yes. germany and britain abstained. they were kind of on the fence. what of the peace talks, which everyone says they want? >> my concern is that this might push peace? further away rather than forward. given that you need israel at the table and that the u.s. tends to be the shepherd of peace talks, the palestinians defied president obama's express wishes not to do this. the u.s. calls for direct negotiations. we have seen this in the wake of the reaction. prime minister netanyahu said this is not a vote for peace. the
, mr. obama found himself on the phone with middle east leaders as israel and hamas in gaza rained down rockets on each other. and secretary clinton headed for the region hoping to use a cease-fire to search for longer term answers. >> now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security, dignity, and legitimate aspirations of palestinians and israelis alike. pete: but she also made it clear the u.s. is firmly supporting its ally israel. peter baker was traveling with the president. peter, with all the changes in the region, how has the u.s. role changed in this process? >> well, of course, you saw president obama taking a very hands on role in this. something that he's been reluctant to do at times in the past. he had a bad experience trying to involve himself in peace making in the middle east in the beginning of his presidency. he grew a little disenchanted with how intransigent players were. he and netanyahu the prime minister of israel have a troublesome relationship to say the least. and yet he decided in this case he had to
'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approved. >> ( translated ): yes, he might be a dictator for the time being or might have unprecedented power throughout this period of two months, but after that, these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament. >> brown: but tens of thousands of anti-morsi protesters rallied in tahrir square, the heart of last year's popular revolution that led to end of the regime of hosni mubarak. they threw rocks at riot police, who retaliate
to that the escalating tension between israel and hamas and the head spins, martha. >> you need a flow chart for this week. incredible that one week ago tonight we learned about david petraeus and that he resigned as c.i.a. director and today he is up on capitol hill testifying about benghazi. of course, this happened september 11 of this year, the attack in benghazi. a lot of different stories right away about why that happened, how that happened, but it was susan rice, u.n. ambassador, i think it was five days later on the sunday talk shows saying that she thought it came as a result of some protests and because of the egyptian in cairo, there were protests about this anti-muslim film. the republicans have pounced on that. you heard john mccain and lindsey graham saying there is no way they want her to be secretary of state, nominated to secretary of state. everybody knew that it was terrorism. >> everybody knew it was terrorism. well, today, one of the things that david petraeus said is that he knew right away it was terrorism. and in the talking points, they took that out because it was
higher by three. >> susie: stocks also rose on news of a ceasefire in the fighting between hamas and israel in the gaza strip. the announcement came after a week of rocket attacks and counter-attacks that has killed an estimated 150 people. most of the dead are palestinians. and just before that agreement to end hostilities, a bomb exploded in a tel aviv bus station injuring 27. >> tom: i don't wake up trying to solve for wall street, i wake up trying to solve for our members and customers each and every day. still ahead, we talk health care reform with florida's largest health insurer, chairman and c.e.o. of florida blue, patrick gerahty joins us. >> tom: among the taxes scheduled to go up on new year's day if there is no solution to the fiscal cliff are taxes on dividends and capital gains. 403 of the 500 companies in the s&p 500 stock index now pay investors to hold their stock. that's the highest number since 1999. these companies paid shareholders a record $34 billion in cash in august alone. the threat of higher taxes on investments has hit stocks of traditional dividend pa
is necessary to defend our people. >> this is what the israelis call a surgical strike. an underground hamas, launching site taken out with pinpoint accuracy. israel has been accused of killing in a sense, too. -- innocentsm, too. the father insists there were no militants or missile sites in the area. >> we are civilians. around our house, all are civilians. no one is firing. >> egypt has denied reports to be arranged a truce. >> for more on the high stakes of this escalating violence, i folk with former senator george mitchell. -- i spoke with former senator george mitchell. thank you very much for joining me. neither side appears to be backing down. this is not going to be over in a few days. just how serious is this? could we be seeing the start of the war? >> it is a very serious issue. i've been saying for some time, nearly a year, there was a will that had created a false sense of security on all sides. the real danger is not so much from the internal conflict within gaza, it is given the highly unstable and volatile situation in the region, this could be a spark that lights a conflic
neil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: israel and hamas agreed to a cease-fto
talks with both sides to work on details of the ceasefire. with discussions underway, a hamas has been for the first time allowed to control the border area between israel and gaza to control the violence. our correspondent is there. >> there is a high chance we would have been killed if we had tried to come here just a couple of weeks back. but the cease-fire means israel has lifted the buffer zone it had inside got up for years. now we and how moscow and go right to the border and sand -- now we, and how moscow, can go right to the border and stand. >> it is amazing that they can't stand so close to the border with the israeli army just -- can stand so close to the border with the israeli army just on the other side. but that is one of the reasons they have called a victory for them. >> it is certainly good for the palestinians that have farmland under the watchful eye of the israelis. suleyman has not been able to farm his land close to the border because of the israeli restrictions. >> it is my first day here, and i feel safe, he said. the army jeeps have been coming year without d
morsi's role in the cease-fire between israel and hamas. concern was growing about more trouble in cairo tomorrow. this afternoon, the muzz lum brotherhood spokesman said the party had postponed demonstrations tuesday to avoid bloodshed. >> brown: a short while ago i spoke with nancy youssef. nan nancy youssef, let's begin with the latest statements from president morsi's spokesman. it's hard to know whether the president is backing off or simply clarifying the pronouncements he made late last week. how is it being red in cairo? >> >> reporter: that's exactly how it feels here after several days of protests, and tents in tahrir square, the scene that led to the overthrough of the previous regime. a spokesman came out saying he would have the final say over all sovereign matters. what constitutes a sovereign matter remains unclear. it seems they could be as broad or as specific as morsi wants. and under that agreement, he has ultimate say oaf those matters, and there's nobody who can overrule his decision. and that could apply to thingses like the commit they will draft the perm
, it's really going to hinder oil prices. >> reporter: if the recent cease-fire between hamas and israel in the gaza strip holds, many think prices at the pump will drift lower. it also helps that u.s. refineries are producing ample supplies of gasoline. a.a.a. expects regular unleaded to end the year between $3.10 and $3.30 a gallon. but longer term, the price of gasoline depends on the strength of the global economy. >> my outlook right now for gasoline prices is, we are going to continue to come off some more? the thing with gasoline, you can't shove it down people's throats. they just don't have the money for higher oil prices. hence, that's going to put a cap on it. >> reporter: with only about a month left, 2012 is expected to be the most expensive year for gasoline ever. americans are expected to spend about $12 billion more to fill up their tanks this year compared to last. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: what determines gas prices? as erika just reported, there's more to it than supply and demand. to learn more about prices at the pump, visit our web site,
in humanas-- hamas built in the year 59. 59, that has been-- . >> rose: 59. >> 59 bc, that has been destroyed or damaged seriously, i don't know exactly what. two mosques, one in homs. >> rose: two mosques. >> two mosques, also of the beginning of islam. the market in-- the covered market in a legal-- aleppo is a part of the heritage has been burned. so the country is being destroyed. i didn't realize that how rich the past of syria is. the looting of archaeological things is taking place. not as bad as it happened in iraq but bad enough already. so this is what is happening. are you going to have, what i am saying is the choice really now is between a failed state or a political solution. there is no third option. >> rose: but is it primarily russia. >> no. >> rose: which has to change. >> no, no, i think everybody has to make an effort. it's, you know, this is you know what kofi annan called fingerpointing. that's not what you want. russia is a responsible member, permanent member, so is china. you've got to reach out to them and you know try again with them. >> rose: but are you saying-- b
province of hama, a suicide car bomb killed at least 50 syrian soldiers and gunmen. across greece today, services ground to a halt in the face of a new protest against austerity measures. the governing coalition presented its latest package to parliament, $17 billion in spending cuts and tax hikes. in response, transport workers, journalists, doctors, and many shopkeepers stopped work for 48 hours. many showed up for marches in athens to show their opposition. trading was light on wall street today ahead of the presidential election. the dow jones industrial average gained 19 points to close at 13,112. the nasdaq rose more than 17 points to close above 2,999. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: the northeast took slow steps toward recovery today, one week after hurricane sandy hit. but for many in new jersey and new york, normal routines are still a long way off. we have two reports, beginning with an overview from kwame holman. >> reporter: it was the closest think to a full-scale morning commute since the storm hit a week ago. it taxed transit syste
hamas slid closer to all-out war today. the israelis blasted gaza with scores of air strikes, and the palestinians said 16 people were killed there. hamas and its allies fired more than 200 rockets and even struck as far away as tel aviv. three israelis were killed. we begin with this report by john ray of "independent television news." ( gunfire ) >> reporter: in gaza, gunfire and a thirst for revenge. thousands throng the streets for the funeral of a hamas leader killed by israel. the first death of this conflict but how many more will follow? the mood here is of great anger and defiance. militarily, hamas is no match for the israeli air force. but they say this ia death that must and will be avenged. so, no ceasefire in sight, just a ceasel >> this is nbr.
. >> brown: there was no let-up today in the battle between israel and hamas, the palestinian group that rules gaza. air strikes echoed across gaza, and rockets landed near tel aviv and, for the first time, near jerusalem. the combined death toll reached 30-- 27 palestinians and three israelis. we begin with a report from john ray of independent television news in gaza. >> reporter: a sleepless night in gaza gave way to another morning of missiles. israel promised a lull in their assault, a chance for words to speak louder than bombs. but on neither side was there a cease-fire. and if the egyptian prime minster came armed with a peace plan, he kept it to himself. this was far more a display of muslim brotherhood with hamas. hesham qandeel called gaza a tragedy, and israel the aggressor. the tragedy is deeply personal, and it unfolds at the gaza city hospital where they rush the dead and the injured. boys like yea, just ten years old. "i was buying bread for my mother," he says, "when the rocket came." dooah, a girl of 14, was hit my shrapnel on her way to a wedding. "all i remember
and hamas rockets targeted tel aviv in day two of a growing middle east conflict. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the war which has claimed civilian deaths on both sides. >> brown: then, b.p. admits to felony charges and agrees to pay the largest single criminal fine in u.s. history. we examine the legal resolution of the gulf coast spill, two years later. >> suarez: science correspondent miles o'brien asks an age old question. why do we sleep? the answer comes from an unlikely underwater source. >> no, you don't need more sleep? you're getting plenty of sleep right? are you getting plenty of sleep? yes. >> brown: china's new leader will head both the communist party and the military. we assess the change at the top in beijing. >> suarez: and we close with the story of volunteers stepping up to help victims of hurricane sandy in the borough of queens in new york. >> there's people who have been without attention for a long time. some with, some without running water. definitely without power. you know,
wave of deadly airstrikes at gaza today, and hamas fighters sent a volley of rockets into southern israel, six days after the escalation began. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have reports from gaza city and tel aviv, and talk with journalist nancy youssef in cairo, where diplomatic efforts to broker peace are under way. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the other hot conflict in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this
of air strikes and rockets between israel and hamas. rumors of a cease-fire flew all day, and secretary of state clinton arrived in the region after nightfall. >> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening. i'm susie gharib. federal reserve chairman ben
of hamas. >> ifill: plus, there were new calls today for laws to police pharmacies like the one linked to the meningitis outbreak. betty ann bowser's update includes the story of one family's loss from the disease. >> i can't really think of one them them without the other. he was such a vibrant person that who lit up the room and there's such a great big hole missing. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the president faced the white house press corps today in a wide-ranging session. he addressed two major stories-- the fiscal cliff and the sex scandal that ousted the c.i.a. director-- plus immigration, climate change and more. newshour correspondent kwame holman has the story. >> please have a seat. i hear you have some questions for me. ( laughter ) >> reporter: the president w
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)